Thursday, September 6, 2012

The Settlement Market

With all these settlements awarded to people, a market for settlements was formed from the need for people to turn future payments into current cash. Companies that deal specifically in assisting beneficiaries in converting their structured settlements are becoming more common. Still, the cost of redistribution of funds can be costly.

Those who have received (or are still receiving) regular payments are well aware of the unsolicited proposals from individuals and companies hoping to take advantage of mismanaged finances. The more unscrupulous companies have discounted the future annuity payments by as much as 40%, locking in a sizable risk-adjusted return. Due to this situation, about two-thirds of US states have enforced restrictions surrounding tax-free structured settlements.

Also, some insurance companies will not assign or transfer annuities to third parties in order to discourage the sale of structured settlements.

Some institutions will allow the partial sale of future payments. A majority of structured settlement sales are arranged in this manner, in which beneficiaries sell only the minimum portion of payments necessary to cover the most immediate of circumstances.

If you're considering selling all or a portion of a structured settlement, study the reputation of the company providing the payments. Don't get involved with a company that might become insolvent before paying out your buyout money. Also, consult with an attorney and a tax advisor before entering into any transactions. Approach potential buyers through a structured settlement broker who can compare and contrast differing offers for you and has the resources to provide legal and transaction guidance.

Take my money,

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